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Army Related Forum Topics about the Israeli armed forces, special forces, tanks, apc's, guns etc + world armies.

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Old 08-21-2006, 04:14 AM
Abdul Natas Abdul Natas is offline
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Okay, I notice there's been some bickering on the boards and off-topic straying since my absense, so here's a post to get everyone back on the same page, and bring some order back to the forums.

Does anyone here have any new ideas on how we can defeat Hezbollah, Iran, and sort out this whole mess with Palestine? I'm open to any suggestions. Remember, keep these comments creative and tasteful. Also remember first prize for best answer (hasn't been won yet, keeping my fingers crossed, though) is the Israeli medal of honor, our country's highest achievement!



Hopefully this'll get everyone back on the ball. Sheesh! A moderator's work is never done.

Just a friendly reminder to all you forum-members that our 5th annual signature photo pagent is being held October 2nd, and that's just right around the corner from now. So cast your nominations for the forum member with best image in his or her signature space.

Remember, last year's competition was won by none other than our beloved Bradley Studebaker from Kathmandu, Nepal for this beautiful photograph of a sunflower (photographed in fact by Mr. Studebaker himself):


Runner up was of course kitten314 from Niamey, Niger with a whimsical rendering of her local librarian:



So chop-chop, let's get those nominations in folks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascal
Cool robot.That is me in the future-40 yrs and still trucking.{but not actually me in real time}

PS->I forgot to ask who is the bald guy in you sig?
It's rude to call people bald to their faces. Don't you have any manners?

Am I the only man in the world with a plan?

No wonder the world is falling apart. You all rely on me too much...

I was being sarcastic Tokyo! Do you have any bones of humour in your body?

Why would I want to have 5 accounts running or more when I don't even have time to post under this account?

Do you have more than one account?

Even if you did, I wouldn't be posting ad nauseum in every thread about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by G. Willickers
Kepahl, I don't know you, and quite frankly I don't want to know you. Same goes for those Gunstons.
With friends like you who needs Tokyo?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarmaPolice
Just out of curiosity then, why are you in a forum for the Israeli military? I'm sure there's an Indian Military forum somewhere about
That's just it.

The Israelis are one of the most racist countries in the world.

Want to get married in Israel?

My friend married a non Jew and they had to have the wedding on some island off the coast of Israel for some stupid reason.

Another friend tried to enroll in a language course in Israel but it was for Jews only.

There is a lot I don't know about Israel and I'm not going to learn it on the Indian Defence Force forum.

I want to to get my teeth in to all what's wrong over here...

Thanks for the tip.
I'm sure the boys will be up for a bit of the old Iranian Dates up the khyber... probably as soon as the curtains come down here we'll take the show over there.

Give us some links please.....

Hello there friends from around the world!
I am a moulder/sculptor for the past 22 years. I took up moulding and sculpting after I lost my leg in the Iran-Iraq war in 1983.
I’m looking forward to getting to know everyone better and sharing some stories and pictures with you all.
Hello Mr. Leaky. I am a lover of hard materials so i mainly sculpt rock, wood and stone but i have been known to get hot and sweaty whilst chipping away at some soft stuff also.
Here is a pic of my latest piece.
I call it phallic scorn of ejaculate death to infidel.


I call this one Jump infidelis charlatan for the love of Allah and for turban kind around the world.


I call this one: Heaven in a tea cup, infidels dreams.


I call this one "Infidel Dog Sun Rising".
Your comments and suggestions are most welcome.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo
My ex-wife and I were having all sorts of bother when trying for our 13 child. We tried many different things but to no avail. Finally my great great grandmother told me about a secret Iranian technique for assisting in the act of impregnation. I will share this with you today my friend.
STEP:
1 You must abstain from all sexual activity for 1 month (that includes wanking)
2 Your wife should masturbate in front of you every night for 1 month (keep in mind that there is to be no cock touching etc. if you dribble a bit that’s ok but refrain from ejaculation at all costs).
3 After your girlfriend has orgasmed you should place your head between her legs and take a long deep sniff in.
4 Then immediately dump a bucket of cold water on your head
5 On the last day of the month you should purchase the finest looking ram that you can find. Skin and dress the goat (the meat should be salted down and consumed the day of impregnation conferment). You should remove the testicles from the carcass and using some tire wire or the like make a pair of earrings.
6 On the last night of the month your wife should come to you wearing nothing but the testicle earrings and you should be wearing the rams skin cloak.
7 Assume the position of the dog and proceed with long slow deep strokes.
8 As the vinegar stroke approaches you should gorge yourself on the testicle earrings.
9 Shoot your month backed up load deep inside your wife and be sure to give praise to almighty Allah.
10 Whip it out and wipe it.
I hope that helps you my friend, if it’s a boy I would be honoured if you would name him Abdul!?

Yes, I know this technique very well but which wife should you use for this?

Nonsencevvv

Yes, yes, good suggestions all! I've fowarded them to the Israeli ministry of defense, and we'll see if they have a go at any of these ideas. Remember the winner will be awarded this shiny medal, our country's highest honor!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Balam
Do you understand the meaning of "sarcasm".? Mr. Kephallickers
Balaaaaam? Now, now, we've spoken about this before, and what did I say? That's right! Sarcasm is strictly forbidden on this forum.

I hate to do this, but once again, here's the list of acceptable forms of humor we allow:

Anecdotes
Caricatures
Conundrums
Hyperbole
Wisecracks
Parody
Understatement
Puns
Situational Humor

That is all!

Why do you continually spam this site cluttering it up with useless information?

Tokyo is a spambot.

I still think the curry bbq is the best plan. I'll even fund it.

Good to see the Germans making more repatriations..
Hope they give a big discount.
You'd never see the Japanese selling subs to the chinks, is that right Tokyo?



I couldn't sleep last night for fear of Tokyo's curse.

Tokyo must be new to the internet. He keeps finding 'news' that he has to share with the rest of the world.

Buddy, we know how to use google and when we want to read the news we go to out favorit little propoganda sites.

We don't need you to give us little news feeds that are off topic all the time.

STOP SPAMMING THIS SITE WITH IRRELEVENT TOPICS.

Kepahl, I realize I was out of line with that comment. Been going through a lot lately. Listen, let me private message you my home phone number, and maybe you and I can get together these weekend and I'll buy you a beer.

Hope to hear from you soon.

Cheers!
--Tokyo


I accept your apology Tokyo.

Thanks for that.

More than a big city you are a big woman too.

I'm touched.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo_
I believe a close study of Arabian Literature may hold the key to wiping out this deadly ideology.

The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Arabian nights)
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Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar.


"Arabian Nights" redirects here. For other uses, see Arabian Nights (disambiguation).
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Persian: هزار و یک شب Hazār-o Yak *ab, Arabic: كتاب ألف ليلة و ليلة‎ Kitāb 'Alf Layla wa-Layla; also known as The Book of a Thousand Nights and a Night, One Thousand and One Nights, 1001 Arabian Nights, Arabian Nights, The Nightly Entertainments or simply The Nights) is a medieval Middle-Eastern literary epic which tells the story of Scheherazade (Shahrzad in Persian), a Sassanid Queen, who must relate a series of stories to her malevolent husband, King Shahryar, to delay her execution. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she ends the story with a suspenseful situation, forcing the King to keep her alive for another day. The individual stories were created over many centuries, by many people and in many styles, and they have become famous in their own right. Notable examples include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.
Contents

[hide]//
[edit]

History

The nucleus of the stories is formed by a Pahlavi Sassanid Persian book called Hazār Afsānah[1] ("Thousand Myths", in Persian: هزارافسانه). During the reign of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid in the 8th century, Baghdad had become an important cosmopolitan city. Merchants from Persia, China, India, Africa, and Europe were all found in Baghdad. It was during this time that many of the stories, which were originally folk stories, are thought to have been collected orally over many years and later then compiled into a single book. The later compiler and translator into Arabic is reputedly storyteller Abu abd-Allah Muhammed el-Gahshigar in the 9th century. The frame story of Shahrzad seems to have been added in the 14th century. The first modern Arabic compilation, made out of Egyptian writings, was published in Cairo in 1835.
[edit]

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
See also: List of stories within The Book of One Thousand and One Nights
The story takes place in the Sassanid era and begins with the Persian king Shahryar. The king rules an unnamed island "between India and China" (in modern editions based on Arab transcripts he is king of India and China). When Shahryar discovers his wife plotting with a lover to kill him, he has the pair executed. Believing all women to be likewise unfaithful, he gives his vizier an order to get him a new wife every night (in some versions, every third night). After spending one night with his bride, the king has her executed at dawn. This practice continues for some time, until the vizier's clever daughter Sheherazade ("Scheherazade" in English, or "Shahrastini", a Persian name) forms a plan and volunteers to become Shahrayar's next wife. With the help of her sister Dunyazad, every night after their marriage she spends hours telling him stories, each time stopping at dawn with a cliffhanger, so the king will postpone the execution out of a desire to hear the rest of the tale. In the end, she has given birth to three sons, and the king has been convinced of her faithfulness and revoked his decree.
The tales vary widely; they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and Muslim religious legends. Some of the famous stories Shahrazad spins in many western translations are Aladdin's Lamp, the Persian Sindbad the Sailor, and the tale of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; however Aladdin and Ali Baba were in fact inserted only in the 18th century by Antoine Galland, a French orientalist, who claimed to have heard them in oral form from a Maronite story-teller from Aleppo in Syria. Numerous stories depict djinn, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography; the historical caliph Harun al-Rashid is a common protagonist, as are his alleged court poet Abu Nuwas and his vizier, Ja'far al-Barmaki. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.
On the final (one thousand and first) night Sheherazade presents the King with their three sons and she asks him for a complete pardon. He grants her this and they live in relative satisfaction.
Note: the narrator's standards for what consitutes a cliffhanger seem broader than in modern literature. While in many cases a story is cut off with the hero in life danger or another kind of deep trouble, in some parts of the full text Scheherazade stops her narration in the middle of an exposition of abstract philosophical principles or abstruse points of Islamic theology, and in one case during a detailed description of human anatomy according to Galen - and in all these cases turns out to be justified in her belief that the king's curiosity about the sequel would buy her another day of life.
Spoilers end here.
[edit]

Editions


The book cover of Sir Richard Francis Burton edition.


The work is made up of a collection of stories thought to be from traditional Persian, Arabic, and Indian stories. The core stories probably originated in an Iranic Empire and were brought together in a Persian work called Hazar Afsanah ("A Thousand Legends"). The Arabic compilation Alf Layla (A Thousand Nights), originating about 850 AD, was in turn probably an abridged translation of Hezar Afsaneh. Some of its elements appear in the Odyssey. The present name Alf Layla wa-Layla (literally a "A Thousand Nights and a Night", i.e. "1001 Nights") seems to have appeared at an unknown time in the Middle Ages, and expresses the idea of a transfinite number since 1000 represented conceptual infinity within Arabic mathematical circles.
The first European version (and first printed edition) was a translation into French (1704 - 1717) by Antoine Galland from an earlier compilation that was written in Arabic. This 12 volume book, Les Mille et une nuits, contes arabes traduits en français ("Thousand and one nights, Arab stories translated into French") probably included Arabic stories known to the translator but not included in the Arabic compilation. Aladdin's Lamp and Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves appeared first in Galland's translation and cannot be found in the original writings. He wrote that he heard them from a Syrian Christian storyteller from Aleppo, a Maronite scholar, Youhenna Diab, whom he called 'Hanna'.

John Payne, Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories, (London 1901) gives details of Galland's encounter with 'Hanna' in 1709 and of the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin and two more of the 'interpolated' tales. He instances Galland's own experience to demonstrate the lack of regard for such entertainments in the mainstream of Islamic scholarship, with the result that
…complete copies of the genuine work were rarely to be met with, collections… and the fragmentary copies which existed were mostly in the hands of professional story-tellers, who were extremely unwilling to part with them, looking upon them as their stock in trade, and were in the habit of incorporating with the genuine text all kinds of stories and anecdotes from other sources, to fill the place of the missing portions of the original work. This process of addition and incorporation, which has been in progress ever since the first collection of the Nights into one distinct work and is doubtless still going on in Oriental countries, (especially such as are least in contact with European influence,) may account for the heterogeneous character of the various modern manuscripts of the Nights and for the immense difference which exists between the several texts, as well in actual contents as in the details and diction of such stories as are common to all.

Perhaps the best-known translation to English speakers is that by Sir Richard Francis Burton, entitled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (1885). Unlike previous editions, his ten volume translation was not bowdlerized. Though printed in the Victorian era, it contained all the erotic nuances of the source material, replete with sexual imagery and pederastic allusions added as appendices to the main stories by Burton. Burton circumvented strict Victorian laws on obscene material by printing an edition for subscribers only rather than formally publishing the book. The original ten volumes were followed by a further six entitled The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night which were printed between 1886 and 1888.
More recent versions are that of the French doctor J. C. Mardrus, translated into English by Powys Mathers, and, notably, a critical edition based on the 14th century Syrian manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, compiled in Arabic by Muhsin Mahdi and rendered into English by Husain Haddawy, the most accurate and elegant of all to this date.
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has an estranged cousin: The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki. A Polish noble of the late 18th century, he traveled the Orient looking for an original edition of The Book... but never found it. Upon returning to Europe, he wrote his masterpiece, a multi-leveled frame tale.
[edit]

Adaptations

[edit]

Film and Television


Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar, in the ABC/BBC Miniseries Arabian Nights.


There have been many adaptations of the Nights, for both television and the big screen, with varying degrees of faithfulness to the original stories.
The atmosphere of the Nights influenced such films as Fritz Lang's 1921 Der müde Tod, the 1924 Hollywood film The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, and its 1940 British remake. It also influenced The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), the first surviving feature-length animated film.
One of Hollywood's first feature films to be based on the Nights was in 1942, with the movie named Arabian Nights. It starred Maria Montez as Scheherazade, Sabu Dastagir as Ali Ben Ali and Jon Hall as Harun al-Rashid. The storyline bears virtually no resemblance to the traditional version of the Nights. In the film Scheherazade is a dancer, who attempts to overthrow Caliph Harun al-Rashid and marry his brother. Unfortunately Scheherazade’s initial coup attempt fails and she is sold into slavery, many adventures then ensue. Maria Montez and Jon Hall also starred in the 1944 film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
The 1980s "1001 Erotic Nights", starring Annette Haven as Scheherazade and John Leslie as Shahryar, was supposedly the first X-rated movie with a million-dollar budget.
The most commercially successful movie based on the Nights was Aladdin, the 1992 animated movie by the Walt Disney Company, which starred Scott Weinger and Robin Williams. The film led to several sequels and a television series of the same name.
The Voyages of Sinbad have been adapted for television and film several times, the most recent of which was in the 2003 animated feature Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, which starred Brad Pitt and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Perhaps the most famous Sinbad film was the 1958 movie The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, produced by the stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen.
A recent well-received television adaptation was the Emmy award winning miniseries Arabian Nights, directed by Steve Barron and starring Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar. It was originally shown over two nights on April 30, and May 1, 2000 on ABC in the United States and BBC One in the United Kingdom.
Other notable versions of the Nights include the famous 1974 Italian movie Il fiore delle mille e una notte by Pier Paolo Pasolini and the 1990 French movie Les 1001 nuits, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones as Scheherazade. There are also numerous Bollywood movies, such as Aladdin and Sinbad in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures; in this version, the lamp's djin is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
[edit]

Video Games

The upcoming game Sonic and the Secret Rings (2007), according to SEGA's press release announcing the game, will be a loose adaptation of the Arabian Nights in which the last several pages from the Arabian Nights storybook have gone missing, and it's up to Sonic to re-create the story.
[edit]

Upcoming Movies

A film entitled 1001 Nights, written by Jeff Vlaming and due out 2006, is to be set in the present day and star Juliette Binoche and Laurence Fishburne. It portrays Scheherazade’s equivalent as the unfaithful wife of a mobster, who is kidnapped by her husband's henchmen and forced to tell stories in order to win her freedom.
Another film based on the Nights, is due out in 2007 and is simply named Arabian Nights. Written by Enio Rigolin, it will depict a more traditional version of the Nights set in ancient Persia.
[edit]

Music

In 1888, Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed his Op. 35 Scheherazade, in four movements, based upon four of the tales from the Arabian Nights; The Sea and Sinbad's Ship, The Kalendar Prince, The Young Prince and The Young Princess, and Festival At Baghdad.
In 1975, the band Renaissance released an album called Scheherazade and Other Stories. The second half of this album consists entirely of the Song Of Scheherazade, an orchestral-rock composition based on the Arabian Nights stories.
In 2003, Nordic experimental indie pop group When released an album called "Pearl Harvest" with lyrics from Arabian Nights. "Ebony Horse", "Goose poor Goose, "Prince Kamar" and "Keys" are all taken directly from Arabian Nights. The music is also an ironic reflection on it, combining Beach Boys rock & roll with plunderphonics.
[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Abdol Hossein Saeedian, "Land and People of Iran" p. 447
[edit]

See also[edit]

External links

[edit]

References



Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arabian Nights



Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: One Thousand and One Nights
[edit]

Film and television links[edit]

Music linksRetrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boo...and_One_Nights"
Categories: Arabic literature | Persian literature | Persian mythology | Indian literature | Epics | Series of fantasy books | The Book of One Thousand and One Nights | Pederasty | Motif of harmful sensation


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What an excellent read that woas and what a great suggestion by you Tokyo.

Peace to all in the world.

Some of my best friends are Muslim. A few Jews in there as well, some Christians...

Doesn't matter to me what there religion is as long they obey the law and don't cause any trouble.

This is what happened.

1) Terrorists kidnapped 3 israeli soldiers.


2) Israel invaded Labonon. (again).

3) Israel got there arses whipped.

War does not accomplish anything so it seems.

Now there is a ceasefire that gives the terrorists a chance to get stronger.

BTW. Welcone to the forum.

Click the ignore button in your profile for Rascal & Tokyo's posts and they won't be able to bother you.

NZ's topless bikers: once were wobblers

One of twenty-five topless porn stars rides down Queen Street in Auckland today.
Photo: Wayne Drought

Latest related coverage

AdvertisementAdvertisement

August 23, 2006 - 4:05PM
Page 1 of 2 | Single page
A nippy south-westerly wind whipping up Queen Street was not enough to keep the tops on 20 female porn stars, much to the delight of the thousands who lined the Auckland street for a peek.
The much-anticipated and controversial Boobs on Bikes parade promoting this weekend's Erotica expo, celebrated its most successful turn out ever.
Thousands of people from construction workers, school boys, corporate business men and women, elderly couples and stunned passers-by jostled for a spot on the pavement to get a glimpse.
The 20 porn stars in studded knee-high boots, black leather pants and dark glasses hitched themselves on to the back of motorbikes and paraded down Queen Street.
Auckland City Councillors this week tried unsuccessfully to halt the parade, which mayor Dick Hubbard described as "morally repugnant".
Parade organiser Steve Crow said those who strongly opposed the exposure should just stay away.
"If it was a religious parade I'm not religious and I would choose to stay out of Queen Street for the day - they've got the choice," Mr Crow said.
"It's been an awesome promotion for us. We've run this six or seven times and we've never advertised.
"This year Dick Hubbard decides to stick his nose in and offered us a media bonanza."
Mr Crow said the parade would definitely be back next year regardless of any new bylaws the Auckland City Council may pass to try to ban it.
"The only way they could legally stop it would be to change the constitution of New Zealand and remove women's rights to bare their breasts in public," he said.
Jan Maree, comedian and co-host for Erotica who travelled in the lead car in front of two army tanks and more than 30 motorbikes, said all women should get their breasts out.
"God gave us these (pointing to her half-exposed breasts) you might as well get them out there, they're all different and it's exciting to see them so why not," Ms Maree said.
"I'm a Christian. I believe in God, I go to church, but I also believe you should be able to do what you feel when you feel and not actually feel any oppression - and I love the attention!"
Scarlett Knight, 22, of Auckland and hailed as New Zealand's first international porn star, said to those against the parade they needed to learn how to have fun.
"I reckon if they don't like it, don't watch," topless Ms Knight said before she rode pillion on one of the motorbikes.
Her colleague, Courtney, 20, who declined to give her surname, said people don't know what they're missing.

"We're all like these bikes, just different models," she said.
Three women in the late 40s who had come in their lunch hour for a look couldn't stop laughing after the parade had passed.
"I brought my staff out for development in the work place, yes that was it," one woman said.
"I'm just laughing because I'm surprised at how small it all was, excuse the expression, and the lack of enhancement.
"There were only a couple that shot towards the sky very unnaturally, but the rest were gathered in their laps and pointing towards the ground."
Another woman said she had no problem with it as long as children weren't around to see it "but everyone knows it's on so they could stay away".
The third woman, with laughter tears streaming down her face said she thought it was seedy and stupid.
"What gets me is the seedy people who travelled in all the way from the suburbs to see booby woman.
"But we liked the guys on the bikes with their boobies."
The parade clogged the street and police helped control traffic backed up during the 30-minute parade.
It prompted union members to momentarily turn their backs on a rally today in Aotea Square protesting National MP Wayne Mapp's bill providing for a 90-day probation period for new employees.
The rally by the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union (EPMU) and the National Distribution Union began at midday and attracted 4000 union workers.
Many were distracted by the commotion of Boobs on Bikes, but they soon returned their attention to the protest.
stuff.co.nz

"We're all like these bikes, just different models," she said.
Three women in the late 40s who had come in their lunch hour for a look couldn't stop laughing after the parade had passed.
"I brought my staff out for development in the work place, yes that was it," one woman said.
"I'm just laughing because I'm surprised at how small it all was, excuse the expression, and the lack of enhancement.
"There were only a couple that shot towards the sky very unnaturally, but the rest were gathered in their laps and pointing towards the ground."
Another woman said she had no problem with it as long as children weren't around to see it "but everyone knows it's on so they could stay away".
The third woman, with laughter tears streaming down her face said she thought it was seedy and stupid.
"What gets me is the seedy people who travelled in all the way from the suburbs to see booby woman.
"But we liked the guys on the bikes with their boobies."
The parade clogged the street and police helped control traffic backed up during the 30-minute parade.
It prompted union members to momentarily turn their backs on a rally today in Aotea Square protesting National MP Wayne Mapp's bill providing for a 90-day probation period for new employees.
The rally by the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union (EPMU) and the National Distribution Union began at midday and attracted 4000 union workers.
Many were distracted by the commotion of Boobs on Bikes, but they soon returned their attention to the protest.
stuff.co.nz

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trevor "Trev" Gunston
I'll take that thanks mensa boy.
Nice find there Trev.

Gems like that are rare. You could get a fair price for that on Yahoo auctions I might add.

Clear cut case of racism. Take them to the Hague.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 110wala
LONG LIVE Hizbullah
That photo looks just like George Nasr.

Anybody else got a close up of George? We may have located him afterall....

We can extradite him like that Karr fiddler.

Last edited by Tokyo; 08-23-2006 at 09:53 PM..
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  #2  
Old 08-21-2006, 10:01 AM
Tokyo
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Today the loser started a 6th account, his new username is Moderator.To all site members, this person is not the moderator for this site, he is the same person who has 5 other usernames at Israel Military.The following User IDs all belong to the same person. All these people are the same person using proxy.1- Kepahl@2- Doris Gunston@3- Trevor trev Gunston@4- Son of Banzai@5- G Willikers
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  #3  
Old 08-22-2006, 06:27 AM
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KarmaPolice KarmaPolice is offline
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With Hezbollah I think the best option is to move in with a large military force like the original plan was and take them out village by village. It'll be bloody but it's the only way to get rid of Hezbollah. After that's done you have a Peacekeeping force move in that has balls to prevent any new terrorist organization from moving in and securing the borders with Syria and Turkey. Secure a resolution that calls for the LAF to move in and actually take control of it's own country, if they do not, you have the peacekeeping force to do the job for them. Eventually radicalism will be largely defeated in Lebanon as it is a fairly moderate nation in the region and slowly you can reduce the peacekeeping force.

Iran is much different. The Iranian people supposedly enjoy many Western ideas so I almost wonder if the strategy the US used in Afghanistan would work (by the way my plan involes the US military not the Israeli). Does anyone know if there is a group in Iran that opposes the Iranian regime that we could arm and move in a contingent of ground troops to support them? If there is we could support them with air and naval units from Iraq and the nearby Persian Gulf. We all know the Iranian military is not a pushover but we could destroy thier anti-air batteries with cruise missiles and Stealth bombers and then move in with the big guns to bomb the living hell outta the Iranian ground forces. I say this plan because this way the Iranian people would be more accepting if it was Iranians liberating them instead of westerners.

With Palestine good lord. As of now the best option I see is build a protective barrier like they have to reduce terrorism like it has and then let them be. They'll be thier own nation and will fail miserably so they will not be a threat and can't blame Israel for thier poverty because they're allowed to do whatever they want except **** with Israel.
__________________
"In order to be a realist, one must believe in miracles" - Ben Gurion

""People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
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  #4  
Old 08-22-2006, 11:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G. Willickers
KP has a totally unrealistic plan, an equally strange conclusions. Good to know that Kepahl's plan will be deleted soon. That one is just too expensive.
Then please, enlighten us with your infinite wisdom. Explain yourself and suggest your own plans. Or would you rather stick to making your signature smug personal attacks?
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  #5  
Old 08-23-2006, 12:59 AM
Tokyo_ Tokyo_ is offline
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I have a suggestion. We should pay close attention to Arab Literature. it may hold the key to stoping this deadly ideology.

The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Arabian nights)
Jump to: navigation, search
Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar.


"Arabian Nights" redirects here. For other uses, see Arabian Nights (disambiguation).
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Persian: هزار و یک شب Hazār-o Yak Šab, Arabic: كتاب ألف ليلة و ليلة‎ Kitāb 'Alf Layla wa-Layla; also known as The Book of a Thousand Nights and a Night, One Thousand and One Nights, 1001 Arabian Nights, Arabian Nights, The Nightly Entertainments or simply The Nights) is a medieval Middle-Eastern literary epic which tells the story of Scheherazade (Shahrzad in Persian), a Sassanid Queen, who must relate a series of stories to her malevolent husband, King Shahryar, to delay her execution. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she ends the story with a suspenseful situation, forcing the King to keep her alive for another day. The individual stories were created over many centuries, by many people and in many styles, and they have become famous in their own right. Notable examples include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.
Contents

[hide]//
[edit]

History

The nucleus of the stories is formed by a Pahlavi Sassanid Persian book called Hazār Afsānah[1] ("Thousand Myths", in Persian: هزارافسانه). During the reign of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid in the 8th century, Baghdad had become an important cosmopolitan city. Merchants from Persia, China, India, Africa, and Europe were all found in Baghdad. It was during this time that many of the stories, which were originally folk stories, are thought to have been collected orally over many years and later then compiled into a single book. The later compiler and translator into Arabic is reputedly storyteller Abu abd-Allah Muhammed el-Gahshigar in the 9th century. The frame story of Shahrzad seems to have been added in the 14th century. The first modern Arabic compilation, made out of Egyptian writings, was published in Cairo in 1835.
[edit]

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
See also: List of stories within The Book of One Thousand and One Nights
The story takes place in the Sassanid era and begins with the Persian king Shahryar. The king rules an unnamed island "between India and China" (in modern editions based on Arab transcripts he is king of India and China). When Shahryar discovers his wife plotting with a lover to kill him, he has the pair executed. Believing all women to be likewise unfaithful, he gives his vizier an order to get him a new wife every night (in some versions, every third night). After spending one night with his bride, the king has her executed at dawn. This practice continues for some time, until the vizier's clever daughter Sheherazade ("Scheherazade" in English, or "Shahrastini", a Persian name) forms a plan and volunteers to become Shahrayar's next wife. With the help of her sister Dunyazad, every night after their marriage she spends hours telling him stories, each time stopping at dawn with a cliffhanger, so the king will postpone the execution out of a desire to hear the rest of the tale. In the end, she has given birth to three sons, and the king has been convinced of her faithfulness and revoked his decree.
The tales vary widely; they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and Muslim religious legends. Some of the famous stories Shahrazad spins in many western translations are Aladdin's Lamp, the Persian Sindbad the Sailor, and the tale of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; however Aladdin and Ali Baba were in fact inserted only in the 18th century by Antoine Galland, a French orientalist, who claimed to have heard them in oral form from a Maronite story-teller from Aleppo in Syria. Numerous stories depict djinn, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography; the historical caliph Harun al-Rashid is a common protagonist, as are his alleged court poet Abu Nuwas and his vizier, Ja'far al-Barmaki. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.
On the final (one thousand and first) night Sheherazade presents the King with their three sons and she asks him for a complete pardon. He grants her this and they live in relative satisfaction.
Note: the narrator's standards for what consitutes a cliffhanger seem broader than in modern literature. While in many cases a story is cut off with the hero in life danger or another kind of deep trouble, in some parts of the full text Scheherazade stops her narration in the middle of an exposition of abstract philosophical principles or abstruse points of Islamic theology, and in one case during a detailed description of human anatomy according to Galen - and in all these cases turns out to be justified in her belief that the king's curiosity about the sequel would buy her another day of life.
Spoilers end here.
[edit]

Editions


The book cover of Sir Richard Francis Burton edition.


The work is made up of a collection of stories thought to be from traditional Persian, Arabic, and Indian stories. The core stories probably originated in an Iranic Empire and were brought together in a Persian work called Hazar Afsanah ("A Thousand Legends"). The Arabic compilation Alf Layla (A Thousand Nights), originating about 850 AD, was in turn probably an abridged translation of Hezar Afsaneh. Some of its elements appear in the Odyssey. The present name Alf Layla wa-Layla (literally a "A Thousand Nights and a Night", i.e. "1001 Nights") seems to have appeared at an unknown time in the Middle Ages, and expresses the idea of a transfinite number since 1000 represented conceptual infinity within Arabic mathematical circles.
The first European version (and first printed edition) was a translation into French (1704 - 1717) by Antoine Galland from an earlier compilation that was written in Arabic. This 12 volume book, Les Mille et une nuits, contes arabes traduits en français ("Thousand and one nights, Arab stories translated into French") probably included Arabic stories known to the translator but not included in the Arabic compilation. Aladdin's Lamp and Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves appeared first in Galland's translation and cannot be found in the original writings. He wrote that he heard them from a Syrian Christian storyteller from Aleppo, a Maronite scholar, Youhenna Diab, whom he called 'Hanna'.
John Payne, Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories, (London 1901) gives details of Galland's encounter with 'Hanna' in 1709 and of the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin and two more of the 'interpolated' tales. He instances Galland's own experience to demonstrate the lack of regard for such entertainments in the mainstream of Islamic scholarship, with the result that
…complete copies of the genuine work were rarely to be met with, collections… and the fragmentary copies which existed were mostly in the hands of professional story-tellers, who were extremely unwilling to part with them, looking upon them as their stock in trade, and were in the habit of incorporating with the genuine text all kinds of stories and anecdotes from other sources, to fill the place of the missing portions of the original work. This process of addition and incorporation, which has been in progress ever since the first collection of the Nights into one distinct work and is doubtless still going on in Oriental countries, (especially such as are least in contact with European influence,) may account for the heterogeneous character of the various modern manuscripts of the Nights and for the immense difference which exists between the several texts, as well in actual contents as in the details and diction of such stories as are common to all.
Perhaps the best-known translation to English speakers is that by Sir Richard Francis Burton, entitled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (1885). Unlike previous editions, his ten volume translation was not bowdlerized. Though printed in the Victorian era, it contained all the erotic nuances of the source material, replete with sexual imagery and pederastic allusions added as appendices to the main stories by Burton. Burton circumvented strict Victorian laws on obscene material by printing an edition for subscribers only rather than formally publishing the book. The original ten volumes were followed by a further six entitled The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night which were printed between 1886 and 1888.
More recent versions are that of the French doctor J. C. Mardrus, translated into English by Powys Mathers, and, notably, a critical edition based on the 14th century Syrian manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, compiled in Arabic by Muhsin Mahdi and rendered into English by Husain Haddawy, the most accurate and elegant of all to this date.
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has an estranged cousin: The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki. A Polish noble of the late 18th century, he traveled the Orient looking for an original edition of The Book... but never found it. Upon returning to Europe, he wrote his masterpiece, a multi-leveled frame tale.
[edit]

Adaptations

[edit]

Film and Television


Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar, in the ABC/BBC Miniseries Arabian Nights.


There have been many adaptations of the Nights, for both television and the big screen, with varying degrees of faithfulness to the original stories.
The atmosphere of the Nights influenced such films as Fritz Lang's 1921 Der müde Tod, the 1924 Hollywood film The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, and its 1940 British remake. It also influenced The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), the first surviving feature-length animated film.
One of Hollywood's first feature films to be based on the Nights was in 1942, with the movie named Arabian Nights. It starred Maria Montez as Scheherazade, Sabu Dastagir as Ali Ben Ali and Jon Hall as Harun al-Rashid. The storyline bears virtually no resemblance to the traditional version of the Nights. In the film Scheherazade is a dancer, who attempts to overthrow Caliph Harun al-Rashid and marry his brother. Unfortunately Scheherazade’s initial coup attempt fails and she is sold into slavery, many adventures then ensue. Maria Montez and Jon Hall also starred in the 1944 film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
The 1980s "1001 Erotic Nights", starring Annette Haven as Scheherazade and John Leslie as Shahryar, was supposedly the first X-rated movie with a million-dollar budget.
The most commercially successful movie based on the Nights was Aladdin, the 1992 animated movie by the Walt Disney Company, which starred Scott Weinger and Robin Williams. The film led to several sequels and a television series of the same name.
The Voyages of Sinbad have been adapted for television and film several times, the most recent of which was in the 2003 animated feature Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, which starred Brad Pitt and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Perhaps the most famous Sinbad film was the 1958 movie The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, produced by the stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen.
A recent well-received television adaptation was the Emmy award winning miniseries Arabian Nights, directed by Steve Barron and starring Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar. It was originally shown over two nights on April 30, and May 1, 2000 on ABC in the United States and BBC One in the United Kingdom.
Other notable versions of the Nights include the famous 1974 Italian movie Il fiore delle mille e una notte by Pier Paolo Pasolini and the 1990 French movie Les 1001 nuits, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones as Scheherazade. There are also numerous Bollywood movies, such as Aladdin and Sinbad in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures; in this version, the lamp's djin is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
[edit]

Video Games

The upcoming game Sonic and the Secret Rings (2007), according to SEGA's press release announcing the game, will be a loose adaptation of the Arabian Nights in which the last several pages from the Arabian Nights storybook have gone missing, and it's up to Sonic to re-create the story.
[edit]

Upcoming Movies

A film entitled 1001 Nights, written by Jeff Vlaming and due out 2006, is to be set in the present day and star Juliette Binoche and Laurence Fishburne. It portrays Scheherazade’s equivalent as the unfaithful wife of a mobster, who is kidnapped by her husband's henchmen and forced to tell stories in order to win her freedom.
Another film based on the Nights, is due out in 2007 and is simply named Arabian Nights. Written by Enio Rigolin, it will depict a more traditional version of the Nights set in ancient Persia.
[edit]

Music

In 1888, Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed his Op. 35 Scheherazade, in four movements, based upon four of the tales from the Arabian Nights; The Sea and Sinbad's Ship, The Kalendar Prince, The Young Prince and The Young Princess, and Festival At Baghdad.
In 1975, the band Renaissance released an album called Scheherazade and Other Stories. The second half of this album consists entirely of the Song Of Scheherazade, an orchestral-rock composition based on the Arabian Nights stories.
In 2003, Nordic experimental indie pop group When released an album called "Pearl Harvest" with lyrics from Arabian Nights. "Ebony Horse", "Goose poor Goose, "Prince Kamar" and "Keys" are all taken directly from Arabian Nights. The music is also an ironic reflection on it, combining Beach Boys rock & roll with plunderphonics.
[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Abdol Hossein Saeedian, "Land and People of Iran" p. 447
[edit]

See also
[edit]

External links

[edit]

References



Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arabian Nights



Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: One Thousand and One Nights

[edit]

Film and television links
[edit]

Music links
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boo...and_One_Nights"
Categories: Arabic literature | Persian literature | Persian mythology | Indian literature | Epics | Series of fantasy books | The Book of One Thousand and One Nights | Pederasty | Motif of harmful sensation


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  #6  
Old 08-23-2006, 12:59 AM
Tokyo_ Tokyo_ is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5
Tokyo_ is on a distinguished road
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I have a suggestion. We should pay close attention to Arab Literature. it may hold the key to stoping this deadly ideology.

The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Arabian nights)
Jump to: navigation, search
Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar.


"Arabian Nights" redirects here. For other uses, see Arabian Nights (disambiguation).
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Persian: هزار و یک شب Hazār-o Yak *ab, Arabic: كتاب ألف ليلة و ليلة‎ Kitāb 'Alf Layla wa-Layla; also known as The Book of a Thousand Nights and a Night, One Thousand and One Nights, 1001 Arabian Nights, Arabian Nights, The Nightly Entertainments or simply The Nights) is a medieval Middle-Eastern literary epic which tells the story of Scheherazade (Shahrzad in Persian), a Sassanid Queen, who must relate a series of stories to her malevolent husband, King Shahryar, to delay her execution. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she ends the story with a suspenseful situation, forcing the King to keep her alive for another day. The individual stories were created over many centuries, by many people and in many styles, and they have become famous in their own right. Notable examples include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.
Contents

[hide]//
[edit]

History

The nucleus of the stories is formed by a Pahlavi Sassanid Persian book called Hazār Afsānah[1] ("Thousand Myths", in Persian: هزارافسانه). During the reign of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid in the 8th century, Baghdad had become an important cosmopolitan city. Merchants from Persia, China, India, Africa, and Europe were all found in Baghdad. It was during this time that many of the stories, which were originally folk stories, are thought to have been collected orally over many years and later then compiled into a single book. The later compiler and translator into Arabic is reputedly storyteller Abu abd-Allah Muhammed el-Gahshigar in the 9th century. The frame story of Shahrzad seems to have been added in the 14th century. The first modern Arabic compilation, made out of Egyptian writings, was published in Cairo in 1835.
[edit]

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
See also: List of stories within The Book of One Thousand and One Nights
The story takes place in the Sassanid era and begins with the Persian king Shahryar. The king rules an unnamed island "between India and China" (in modern editions based on Arab transcripts he is king of India and China). When Shahryar discovers his wife plotting with a lover to kill him, he has the pair executed. Believing all women to be likewise unfaithful, he gives his vizier an order to get him a new wife every night (in some versions, every third night). After spending one night with his bride, the king has her executed at dawn. This practice continues for some time, until the vizier's clever daughter Sheherazade ("Scheherazade" in English, or "Shahrastini", a Persian name) forms a plan and volunteers to become Shahrayar's next wife. With the help of her sister Dunyazad, every night after their marriage she spends hours telling him stories, each time stopping at dawn with a cliffhanger, so the king will postpone the execution out of a desire to hear the rest of the tale. In the end, she has given birth to three sons, and the king has been convinced of her faithfulness and revoked his decree.
The tales vary widely; they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and Muslim religious legends. Some of the famous stories Shahrazad spins in many western translations are Aladdin's Lamp, the Persian Sindbad the Sailor, and the tale of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; however Aladdin and Ali Baba were in fact inserted only in the 18th century by Antoine Galland, a French orientalist, who claimed to have heard them in oral form from a Maronite story-teller from Aleppo in Syria. Numerous stories depict djinn, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography; the historical caliph Harun al-Rashid is a common protagonist, as are his alleged court poet Abu Nuwas and his vizier, Ja'far al-Barmaki. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.
On the final (one thousand and first) night Sheherazade presents the King with their three sons and she asks him for a complete pardon. He grants her this and they live in relative satisfaction.
Note: the narrator's standards for what consitutes a cliffhanger seem broader than in modern literature. While in many cases a story is cut off with the hero in life danger or another kind of deep trouble, in some parts of the full text Scheherazade stops her narration in the middle of an exposition of abstract philosophical principles or abstruse points of Islamic theology, and in one case during a detailed description of human anatomy according to Galen - and in all these cases turns out to be justified in her belief that the king's curiosity about the sequel would buy her another day of life.
Spoilers end here.
[edit]

Editions


The book cover of Sir Richard Francis Burton edition.


The work is made up of a collection of stories thought to be from traditional Persian, Arabic, and Indian stories. The core stories probably originated in an Iranic Empire and were brought together in a Persian work called Hazar Afsanah ("A Thousand Legends"). The Arabic compilation Alf Layla (A Thousand Nights), originating about 850 AD, was in turn probably an abridged translation of Hezar Afsaneh. Some of its elements appear in the Odyssey. The present name Alf Layla wa-Layla (literally a "A Thousand Nights and a Night", i.e. "1001 Nights") seems to have appeared at an unknown time in the Middle Ages, and expresses the idea of a transfinite number since 1000 represented conceptual infinity within Arabic mathematical circles.
The first European version (and first printed edition) was a translation into French (1704 - 1717) by Antoine Galland from an earlier compilation that was written in Arabic. This 12 volume book, Les Mille et une nuits, contes arabes traduits en français ("Thousand and one nights, Arab stories translated into French") probably included Arabic stories known to the translator but not included in the Arabic compilation. Aladdin's Lamp and Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves appeared first in Galland's translation and cannot be found in the original writings. He wrote that he heard them from a Syrian Christian storyteller from Aleppo, a Maronite scholar, Youhenna Diab, whom he called 'Hanna'.
John Payne, Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories, (London 1901) gives details of Galland's encounter with 'Hanna' in 1709 and of the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin and two more of the 'interpolated' tales. He instances Galland's own experience to demonstrate the lack of regard for such entertainments in the mainstream of Islamic scholarship, with the result that
…complete copies of the genuine work were rarely to be met with, collections… and the fragmentary copies which existed were mostly in the hands of professional story-tellers, who were extremely unwilling to part with them, looking upon them as their stock in trade, and were in the habit of incorporating with the genuine text all kinds of stories and anecdotes from other sources, to fill the place of the missing portions of the original work. This process of addition and incorporation, which has been in progress ever since the first collection of the Nights into one distinct work and is doubtless still going on in Oriental countries, (especially such as are least in contact with European influence,) may account for the heterogeneous character of the various modern manuscripts of the Nights and for the immense difference which exists between the several texts, as well in actual contents as in the details and diction of such stories as are common to all.
Perhaps the best-known translation to English speakers is that by Sir Richard Francis Burton, entitled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (1885). Unlike previous editions, his ten volume translation was not bowdlerized. Though printed in the Victorian era, it contained all the erotic nuances of the source material, replete with sexual imagery and pederastic allusions added as appendices to the main stories by Burton. Burton circumvented strict Victorian laws on obscene material by printing an edition for subscribers only rather than formally publishing the book. The original ten volumes were followed by a further six entitled The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night which were printed between 1886 and 1888.
More recent versions are that of the French doctor J. C. Mardrus, translated into English by Powys Mathers, and, notably, a critical edition based on the 14th century Syrian manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, compiled in Arabic by Muhsin Mahdi and rendered into English by Husain Haddawy, the most accurate and elegant of all to this date.
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has an estranged cousin: The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki. A Polish noble of the late 18th century, he traveled the Orient looking for an original edition of The Book... but never found it. Upon returning to Europe, he wrote his masterpiece, a multi-leveled frame tale.
[edit]

Adaptations

[edit]

Film and Television


Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar, in the ABC/BBC Miniseries Arabian Nights.


There have been many adaptations of the Nights, for both television and the big screen, with varying degrees of faithfulness to the original stories.
The atmosphere of the Nights influenced such films as Fritz Lang's 1921 Der müde Tod, the 1924 Hollywood film The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, and its 1940 British remake. It also influenced The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), the first surviving feature-length animated film.
One of Hollywood's first feature films to be based on the Nights was in 1942, with the movie named Arabian Nights. It starred Maria Montez as Scheherazade, Sabu Dastagir as Ali Ben Ali and Jon Hall as Harun al-Rashid. The storyline bears virtually no resemblance to the traditional version of the Nights. In the film Scheherazade is a dancer, who attempts to overthrow Caliph Harun al-Rashid and marry his brother. Unfortunately Scheherazade’s initial coup attempt fails and she is sold into slavery, many adventures then ensue. Maria Montez and Jon Hall also starred in the 1944 film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
The 1980s "1001 Erotic Nights", starring Annette Haven as Scheherazade and John Leslie as Shahryar, was supposedly the first X-rated movie with a million-dollar budget.
The most commercially successful movie based on the Nights was Aladdin, the 1992 animated movie by the Walt Disney Company, which starred Scott Weinger and Robin Williams. The film led to several sequels and a television series of the same name.
The Voyages of Sinbad have been adapted for television and film several times, the most recent of which was in the 2003 animated feature Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, which starred Brad Pitt and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Perhaps the most famous Sinbad film was the 1958 movie The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, produced by the stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen.
A recent well-received television adaptation was the Emmy award winning miniseries Arabian Nights, directed by Steve Barron and starring Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar. It was originally shown over two nights on April 30, and May 1, 2000 on ABC in the United States and BBC One in the United Kingdom.
Other notable versions of the Nights include the famous 1974 Italian movie Il fiore delle mille e una notte by Pier Paolo Pasolini and the 1990 French movie Les 1001 nuits, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones as Scheherazade. There are also numerous Bollywood movies, such as Aladdin and Sinbad in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures; in this version, the lamp's djin is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
[edit]

Video Games

The upcoming game Sonic and the Secret Rings (2007), according to SEGA's press release announcing the game, will be a loose adaptation of the Arabian Nights in which the last several pages from the Arabian Nights storybook have gone missing, and it's up to Sonic to re-create the story.
[edit]

Upcoming Movies

A film entitled 1001 Nights, written by Jeff Vlaming and due out 2006, is to be set in the present day and star Juliette Binoche and Laurence Fishburne. It portrays Scheherazade’s equivalent as the unfaithful wife of a mobster, who is kidnapped by her husband's henchmen and forced to tell stories in order to win her freedom.
Another film based on the Nights, is due out in 2007 and is simply named Arabian Nights. Written by Enio Rigolin, it will depict a more traditional version of the Nights set in ancient Persia.
[edit]

Music

In 1888, Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed his Op. 35 Scheherazade, in four movements, based upon four of the tales from the Arabian Nights; The Sea and Sinbad's Ship, The Kalendar Prince, The Young Prince and The Young Princess, and Festival At Baghdad.
In 1975, the band Renaissance released an album called Scheherazade and Other Stories. The second half of this album consists entirely of the Song Of Scheherazade, an orchestral-rock composition based on the Arabian Nights stories.
In 2003, Nordic experimental indie pop group When released an album called "Pearl Harvest" with lyrics from Arabian Nights. "Ebony Horse", "Goose poor Goose, "Prince Kamar" and "Keys" are all taken directly from Arabian Nights. The music is also an ironic reflection on it, combining Beach Boys rock & roll with plunderphonics.
[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Abdol Hossein Saeedian, "Land and People of Iran" p. 447
[edit]

See also
[edit]

External links

[edit]

References



Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arabian Nights



Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: One Thousand and One Nights

[edit]

Film and television links
[edit]

Music links
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boo...and_One_Nights"
Categories: Arabic literature | Persian literature | Persian mythology | Indian literature | Epics | Series of fantasy books | The Book of One Thousand and One Nights | Pederasty | Motif of harmful sensation


Views


Personal tools




if (window.isMSIE55) fixalpha(); Navigation



Search




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Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-23-2006, 01:00 AM
Tokyo_ Tokyo_ is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5
Tokyo_ is on a distinguished road
Default

I have a suggestion. We should pay close attention to Arab Literature. it may hold the key to stoping this deadly ideology.

The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Arabian nights)
Jump to: navigation, search
Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar.


"Arabian Nights" redirects here. For other uses, see Arabian Nights (disambiguation).
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Persian: هزار و یک شب Hazār-o Yak *ab, Arabic: كتاب ألف ليلة و ليلة‎ Kitāb 'Alf Layla wa-Layla; also known as The Book of a Thousand Nights and a Night, One Thousand and One Nights, 1001 Arabian Nights, Arabian Nights, The Nightly Entertainments or simply The Nights) is a medieval Middle-Eastern literary epic which tells the story of Scheherazade (Shahrzad in Persian), a Sassanid Queen, who must relate a series of stories to her malevolent husband, King Shahryar, to delay her execution. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she ends the story with a suspenseful situation, forcing the King to keep her alive for another day. The individual stories were created over many centuries, by many people and in many styles, and they have become famous in their own right. Notable examples include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.
Contents

[hide]//
[edit]

History

The nucleus of the stories is formed by a Pahlavi Sassanid Persian book called Hazār Afsānah[1] ("Thousand Myths", in Persian: هزارافسانه). During the reign of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid in the 8th century, Baghdad had become an important cosmopolitan city. Merchants from Persia, China, India, Africa, and Europe were all found in Baghdad. It was during this time that many of the stories, which were originally folk stories, are thought to have been collected orally over many years and later then compiled into a single book. The later compiler and translator into Arabic is reputedly storyteller Abu abd-Allah Muhammed el-Gahshigar in the 9th century. The frame story of Shahrzad seems to have been added in the 14th century. The first modern Arabic compilation, made out of Egyptian writings, was published in Cairo in 1835.
[edit]

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
See also: List of stories within The Book of One Thousand and One Nights
The story takes place in the Sassanid era and begins with the Persian king Shahryar. The king rules an unnamed island "between India and China" (in modern editions based on Arab transcripts he is king of India and China). When Shahryar discovers his wife plotting with a lover to kill him, he has the pair executed. Believing all women to be likewise unfaithful, he gives his vizier an order to get him a new wife every night (in some versions, every third night). After spending one night with his bride, the king has her executed at dawn. This practice continues for some time, until the vizier's clever daughter Sheherazade ("Scheherazade" in English, or "Shahrastini", a Persian name) forms a plan and volunteers to become Shahrayar's next wife. With the help of her sister Dunyazad, every night after their marriage she spends hours telling him stories, each time stopping at dawn with a cliffhanger, so the king will postpone the execution out of a desire to hear the rest of the tale. In the end, she has given birth to three sons, and the king has been convinced of her faithfulness and revoked his decree.
The tales vary widely; they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and Muslim religious legends. Some of the famous stories Shahrazad spins in many western translations are Aladdin's Lamp, the Persian Sindbad the Sailor, and the tale of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; however Aladdin and Ali Baba were in fact inserted only in the 18th century by Antoine Galland, a French orientalist, who claimed to have heard them in oral form from a Maronite story-teller from Aleppo in Syria. Numerous stories depict djinn, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography; the historical caliph Harun al-Rashid is a common protagonist, as are his alleged court poet Abu Nuwas and his vizier, Ja'far al-Barmaki. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.
On the final (one thousand and first) night Sheherazade presents the King with their three sons and she asks him for a complete pardon. He grants her this and they live in relative satisfaction.
Note: the narrator's standards for what consitutes a cliffhanger seem broader than in modern literature. While in many cases a story is cut off with the hero in life danger or another kind of deep trouble, in some parts of the full text Scheherazade stops her narration in the middle of an exposition of abstract philosophical principles or abstruse points of Islamic theology, and in one case during a detailed description of human anatomy according to Galen - and in all these cases turns out to be justified in her belief that the king's curiosity about the sequel would buy her another day of life.
Spoilers end here.
[edit]

Editions


The book cover of Sir Richard Francis Burton edition.


The work is made up of a collection of stories thought to be from traditional Persian, Arabic, and Indian stories. The core stories probably originated in an Iranic Empire and were brought together in a Persian work called Hazar Afsanah ("A Thousand Legends"). The Arabic compilation Alf Layla (A Thousand Nights), originating about 850 AD, was in turn probably an abridged translation of Hezar Afsaneh. Some of its elements appear in the Odyssey. The present name Alf Layla wa-Layla (literally a "A Thousand Nights and a Night", i.e. "1001 Nights") seems to have appeared at an unknown time in the Middle Ages, and expresses the idea of a transfinite number since 1000 represented conceptual infinity within Arabic mathematical circles.
The first European version (and first printed edition) was a translation into French (1704 - 1717) by Antoine Galland from an earlier compilation that was written in Arabic. This 12 volume book, Les Mille et une nuits, contes arabes traduits en français ("Thousand and one nights, Arab stories translated into French") probably included Arabic stories known to the translator but not included in the Arabic compilation. Aladdin's Lamp and Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves appeared first in Galland's translation and cannot be found in the original writings. He wrote that he heard them from a Syrian Christian storyteller from Aleppo, a Maronite scholar, Youhenna Diab, whom he called 'Hanna'.
John Payne, Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories, (London 1901) gives details of Galland's encounter with 'Hanna' in 1709 and of the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin and two more of the 'interpolated' tales. He instances Galland's own experience to demonstrate the lack of regard for such entertainments in the mainstream of Islamic scholarship, with the result that
…complete copies of the genuine work were rarely to be met with, collections… and the fragmentary copies which existed were mostly in the hands of professional story-tellers, who were extremely unwilling to part with them, looking upon them as their stock in trade, and were in the habit of incorporating with the genuine text all kinds of stories and anecdotes from other sources, to fill the place of the missing portions of the original work. This process of addition and incorporation, which has been in progress ever since the first collection of the Nights into one distinct work and is doubtless still going on in Oriental countries, (especially such as are least in contact with European influence,) may account for the heterogeneous character of the various modern manuscripts of the Nights and for the immense difference which exists between the several texts, as well in actual contents as in the details and diction of such stories as are common to all.
Perhaps the best-known translation to English speakers is that by Sir Richard Francis Burton, entitled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (1885). Unlike previous editions, his ten volume translation was not bowdlerized. Though printed in the Victorian era, it contained all the erotic nuances of the source material, replete with sexual imagery and pederastic allusions added as appendices to the main stories by Burton. Burton circumvented strict Victorian laws on obscene material by printing an edition for subscribers only rather than formally publishing the book. The original ten volumes were followed by a further six entitled The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night which were printed between 1886 and 1888.
More recent versions are that of the French doctor J. C. Mardrus, translated into English by Powys Mathers, and, notably, a critical edition based on the 14th century Syrian manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, compiled in Arabic by Muhsin Mahdi and rendered into English by Husain Haddawy, the most accurate and elegant of all to this date.
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has an estranged cousin: The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki. A Polish noble of the late 18th century, he traveled the Orient looking for an original edition of The Book... but never found it. Upon returning to Europe, he wrote his masterpiece, a multi-leveled frame tale.
[edit]

Adaptations

[edit]

Film and Television


Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar, in the ABC/BBC Miniseries Arabian Nights.


There have been many adaptations of the Nights, for both television and the big screen, with varying degrees of faithfulness to the original stories.
The atmosphere of the Nights influenced such films as Fritz Lang's 1921 Der müde Tod, the 1924 Hollywood film The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, and its 1940 British remake. It also influenced The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), the first surviving feature-length animated film.
One of Hollywood's first feature films to be based on the Nights was in 1942, with the movie named Arabian Nights. It starred Maria Montez as Scheherazade, Sabu Dastagir as Ali Ben Ali and Jon Hall as Harun al-Rashid. The storyline bears virtually no resemblance to the traditional version of the Nights. In the film Scheherazade is a dancer, who attempts to overthrow Caliph Harun al-Rashid and marry his brother. Unfortunately Scheherazade’s initial coup attempt fails and she is sold into slavery, many adventures then ensue. Maria Montez and Jon Hall also starred in the 1944 film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
The 1980s "1001 Erotic Nights", starring Annette Haven as Scheherazade and John Leslie as Shahryar, was supposedly the first X-rated movie with a million-dollar budget.
The most commercially successful movie based on the Nights was Aladdin, the 1992 animated movie by the Walt Disney Company, which starred Scott Weinger and Robin Williams. The film led to several sequels and a television series of the same name.
The Voyages of Sinbad have been adapted for television and film several times, the most recent of which was in the 2003 animated feature Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, which starred Brad Pitt and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Perhaps the most famous Sinbad film was the 1958 movie The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, produced by the stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen.
A recent well-received television adaptation was the Emmy award winning miniseries Arabian Nights, directed by Steve Barron and starring Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar. It was originally shown over two nights on April 30, and May 1, 2000 on ABC in the United States and BBC One in the United Kingdom.
Other notable versions of the Nights include the famous 1974 Italian movie Il fiore delle mille e una notte by Pier Paolo Pasolini and the 1990 French movie Les 1001 nuits, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones as Scheherazade. There are also numerous Bollywood movies, such as Aladdin and Sinbad in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures; in this version, the lamp's djin is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
[edit]

Video Games

The upcoming game Sonic and the Secret Rings (2007), according to SEGA's press release announcing the game, will be a loose adaptation of the Arabian Nights in which the last several pages from the Arabian Nights storybook have gone missing, and it's up to Sonic to re-create the story.
[edit]

Upcoming Movies

A film entitled 1001 Nights, written by Jeff Vlaming and due out 2006, is to be set in the present day and star Juliette Binoche and Laurence Fishburne. It portrays Scheherazade’s equivalent as the unfaithful wife of a mobster, who is kidnapped by her husband's henchmen and forced to tell stories in order to win her freedom.
Another film based on the Nights, is due out in 2007 and is simply named Arabian Nights. Written by Enio Rigolin, it will depict a more traditional version of the Nights set in ancient Persia.
[edit]

Music

In 1888, Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed his Op. 35 Scheherazade, in four movements, based upon four of the tales from the Arabian Nights; The Sea and Sinbad's Ship, The Kalendar Prince, The Young Prince and The Young Princess, and Festival At Baghdad.
In 1975, the band Renaissance released an album called Scheherazade and Other Stories. The second half of this album consists entirely of the Song Of Scheherazade, an orchestral-rock composition based on the Arabian Nights stories.
In 2003, Nordic experimental indie pop group When released an album called "Pearl Harvest" with lyrics from Arabian Nights. "Ebony Horse", "Goose poor Goose, "Prince Kamar" and "Keys" are all taken directly from Arabian Nights. The music is also an ironic reflection on it, combining Beach Boys rock & roll with plunderphonics.
[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Abdol Hossein Saeedian, "Land and People of Iran" p. 447
[edit]

See also
[edit]

External links

[edit]

References



Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arabian Nights



Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: One Thousand and One Nights

[edit]

Film and television links
[edit]

Music links
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boo...and_One_Nights"
Categories: Arabic literature | Persian literature | Persian mythology | Indian literature | Epics | Series of fantasy books | The Book of One Thousand and One Nights | Pederasty | Motif of harmful sensation


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  #8  
Old 08-23-2006, 01:02 AM
Tokyo_ Tokyo_ is offline
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I believe a close study of Arabian Literature may hold the key to wiping out this deadly ideology.

The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Arabian nights)
Jump to: navigation, search
Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar.


"Arabian Nights" redirects here. For other uses, see Arabian Nights (disambiguation).
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Persian: هزار و یک شب Hazār-o Yak Šab, Arabic: كتاب ألف ليلة و ليلة‎ Kitāb 'Alf Layla wa-Layla; also known as The Book of a Thousand Nights and a Night, One Thousand and One Nights, 1001 Arabian Nights, Arabian Nights, The Nightly Entertainments or simply The Nights) is a medieval Middle-Eastern literary epic which tells the story of Scheherazade (Shahrzad in Persian), a Sassanid Queen, who must relate a series of stories to her malevolent husband, King Shahryar, to delay her execution. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she ends the story with a suspenseful situation, forcing the King to keep her alive for another day. The individual stories were created over many centuries, by many people and in many styles, and they have become famous in their own right. Notable examples include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.
Contents

[hide]//
[edit]

History

The nucleus of the stories is formed by a Pahlavi Sassanid Persian book called Hazār Afsānah[1] ("Thousand Myths", in Persian: هزارافسانه). During the reign of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid in the 8th century, Baghdad had become an important cosmopolitan city. Merchants from Persia, China, India, Africa, and Europe were all found in Baghdad. It was during this time that many of the stories, which were originally folk stories, are thought to have been collected orally over many years and later then compiled into a single book. The later compiler and translator into Arabic is reputedly storyteller Abu abd-Allah Muhammed el-Gahshigar in the 9th century. The frame story of Shahrzad seems to have been added in the 14th century. The first modern Arabic compilation, made out of Egyptian writings, was published in Cairo in 1835.
[edit]

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
See also: List of stories within The Book of One Thousand and One Nights
The story takes place in the Sassanid era and begins with the Persian king Shahryar. The king rules an unnamed island "between India and China" (in modern editions based on Arab transcripts he is king of India and China). When Shahryar discovers his wife plotting with a lover to kill him, he has the pair executed. Believing all women to be likewise unfaithful, he gives his vizier an order to get him a new wife every night (in some versions, every third night). After spending one night with his bride, the king has her executed at dawn. This practice continues for some time, until the vizier's clever daughter Sheherazade ("Scheherazade" in English, or "Shahrastini", a Persian name) forms a plan and volunteers to become Shahrayar's next wife. With the help of her sister Dunyazad, every night after their marriage she spends hours telling him stories, each time stopping at dawn with a cliffhanger, so the king will postpone the execution out of a desire to hear the rest of the tale. In the end, she has given birth to three sons, and the king has been convinced of her faithfulness and revoked his decree.
The tales vary widely; they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and Muslim religious legends. Some of the famous stories Shahrazad spins in many western translations are Aladdin's Lamp, the Persian Sindbad the Sailor, and the tale of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; however Aladdin and Ali Baba were in fact inserted only in the 18th century by Antoine Galland, a French orientalist, who claimed to have heard them in oral form from a Maronite story-teller from Aleppo in Syria. Numerous stories depict djinn, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography; the historical caliph Harun al-Rashid is a common protagonist, as are his alleged court poet Abu Nuwas and his vizier, Ja'far al-Barmaki. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.
On the final (one thousand and first) night Sheherazade presents the King with their three sons and she asks him for a complete pardon. He grants her this and they live in relative satisfaction.
Note: the narrator's standards for what consitutes a cliffhanger seem broader than in modern literature. While in many cases a story is cut off with the hero in life danger or another kind of deep trouble, in some parts of the full text Scheherazade stops her narration in the middle of an exposition of abstract philosophical principles or abstruse points of Islamic theology, and in one case during a detailed description of human anatomy according to Galen - and in all these cases turns out to be justified in her belief that the king's curiosity about the sequel would buy her another day of life.
Spoilers end here.
[edit]

Editions


The book cover of Sir Richard Francis Burton edition.


The work is made up of a collection of stories thought to be from traditional Persian, Arabic, and Indian stories. The core stories probably originated in an Iranic Empire and were brought together in a Persian work called Hazar Afsanah ("A Thousand Legends"). The Arabic compilation Alf Layla (A Thousand Nights), originating about 850 AD, was in turn probably an abridged translation of Hezar Afsaneh. Some of its elements appear in the Odyssey. The present name Alf Layla wa-Layla (literally a "A Thousand Nights and a Night", i.e. "1001 Nights") seems to have appeared at an unknown time in the Middle Ages, and expresses the idea of a transfinite number since 1000 represented conceptual infinity within Arabic mathematical circles.
The first European version (and first printed edition) was a translation into French (1704 - 1717) by Antoine Galland from an earlier compilation that was written in Arabic. This 12 volume book, Les Mille et une nuits, contes arabes traduits en français ("Thousand and one nights, Arab stories translated into French") probably included Arabic stories known to the translator but not included in the Arabic compilation. Aladdin's Lamp and Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves appeared first in Galland's translation and cannot be found in the original writings. He wrote that he heard them from a Syrian Christian storyteller from Aleppo, a Maronite scholar, Youhenna Diab, whom he called 'Hanna'.
John Payne, Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories, (London 1901) gives details of Galland's encounter with 'Hanna' in 1709 and of the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin and two more of the 'interpolated' tales. He instances Galland's own experience to demonstrate the lack of regard for such entertainments in the mainstream of Islamic scholarship, with the result that
…complete copies of the genuine work were rarely to be met with, collections… and the fragmentary copies which existed were mostly in the hands of professional story-tellers, who were extremely unwilling to part with them, looking upon them as their stock in trade, and were in the habit of incorporating with the genuine text all kinds of stories and anecdotes from other sources, to fill the place of the missing portions of the original work. This process of addition and incorporation, which has been in progress ever since the first collection of the Nights into one distinct work and is doubtless still going on in Oriental countries, (especially such as are least in contact with European influence,) may account for the heterogeneous character of the various modern manuscripts of the Nights and for the immense difference which exists between the several texts, as well in actual contents as in the details and diction of such stories as are common to all.
Perhaps the best-known translation to English speakers is that by Sir Richard Francis Burton, entitled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (1885). Unlike previous editions, his ten volume translation was not bowdlerized. Though printed in the Victorian era, it contained all the erotic nuances of the source material, replete with sexual imagery and pederastic allusions added as appendices to the main stories by Burton. Burton circumvented strict Victorian laws on obscene material by printing an edition for subscribers only rather than formally publishing the book. The original ten volumes were followed by a further six entitled The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night which were printed between 1886 and 1888.
More recent versions are that of the French doctor J. C. Mardrus, translated into English by Powys Mathers, and, notably, a critical edition based on the 14th century Syrian manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, compiled in Arabic by Muhsin Mahdi and rendered into English by Husain Haddawy, the most accurate and elegant of all to this date.
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has an estranged cousin: The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki. A Polish noble of the late 18th century, he traveled the Orient looking for an original edition of The Book... but never found it. Upon returning to Europe, he wrote his masterpiece, a multi-leveled frame tale.
[edit]

Adaptations

[edit]

Film and Television


Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar, in the ABC/BBC Miniseries Arabian Nights.


There have been many adaptations of the Nights, for both television and the big screen, with varying degrees of faithfulness to the original stories.
The atmosphere of the Nights influenced such films as Fritz Lang's 1921 Der müde Tod, the 1924 Hollywood film The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, and its 1940 British remake. It also influenced The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), the first surviving feature-length animated film.
One of Hollywood's first feature films to be based on the Nights was in 1942, with the movie named Arabian Nights. It starred Maria Montez as Scheherazade, Sabu Dastagir as Ali Ben Ali and Jon Hall as Harun al-Rashid. The storyline bears virtually no resemblance to the traditional version of the Nights. In the film Scheherazade is a dancer, who attempts to overthrow Caliph Harun al-Rashid and marry his brother. Unfortunately Scheherazade’s initial coup attempt fails and she is sold into slavery, many adventures then ensue. Maria Montez and Jon Hall also starred in the 1944 film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
The 1980s "1001 Erotic Nights", starring Annette Haven as Scheherazade and John Leslie as Shahryar, was supposedly the first X-rated movie with a million-dollar budget.
The most commercially successful movie based on the Nights was Aladdin, the 1992 animated movie by the Walt Disney Company, which starred Scott Weinger and Robin Williams. The film led to several sequels and a television series of the same name.
The Voyages of Sinbad have been adapted for television and film several times, the most recent of which was in the 2003 animated feature Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, which starred Brad Pitt and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Perhaps the most famous Sinbad film was the 1958 movie The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, produced by the stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen.
A recent well-received television adaptation was the Emmy award winning miniseries Arabian Nights, directed by Steve Barron and starring Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar. It was originally shown over two nights on April 30, and May 1, 2000 on ABC in the United States and BBC One in the United Kingdom.
Other notable versions of the Nights include the famous 1974 Italian movie Il fiore delle mille e una notte by Pier Paolo Pasolini and the 1990 French movie Les 1001 nuits, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones as Scheherazade. There are also numerous Bollywood movies, such as Aladdin and Sinbad in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures; in this version, the lamp's djin is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
[edit]

Video Games

The upcoming game Sonic and the Secret Rings (2007), according to SEGA's press release announcing the game, will be a loose adaptation of the Arabian Nights in which the last several pages from the Arabian Nights storybook have gone missing, and it's up to Sonic to re-create the story.
[edit]

Upcoming Movies

A film entitled 1001 Nights, written by Jeff Vlaming and due out 2006, is to be set in the present day and star Juliette Binoche and Laurence Fishburne. It portrays Scheherazade’s equivalent as the unfaithful wife of a mobster, who is kidnapped by her husband's henchmen and forced to tell stories in order to win her freedom.
Another film based on the Nights, is due out in 2007 and is simply named Arabian Nights. Written by Enio Rigolin, it will depict a more traditional version of the Nights set in ancient Persia.
[edit]

Music

In 1888, Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed his Op. 35 Scheherazade, in four movements, based upon four of the tales from the Arabian Nights; The Sea and Sinbad's Ship, The Kalendar Prince, The Young Prince and The Young Princess, and Festival At Baghdad.
In 1975, the band Renaissance released an album called Scheherazade and Other Stories. The second half of this album consists entirely of the Song Of Scheherazade, an orchestral-rock composition based on the Arabian Nights stories.
In 2003, Nordic experimental indie pop group When released an album called "Pearl Harvest" with lyrics from Arabian Nights. "Ebony Horse", "Goose poor Goose, "Prince Kamar" and "Keys" are all taken directly from Arabian Nights. The music is also an ironic reflection on it, combining Beach Boys rock & roll with plunderphonics.
[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Abdol Hossein Saeedian, "Land and People of Iran" p. 447
[edit]

See also
[edit]

External links

[edit]

References



Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arabian Nights



Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: One Thousand and One Nights

[edit]

Film and television links
[edit]

Music links
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boo...and_One_Nights"
Categories: Arabic literature | Persian literature | Persian mythology | Indian literature | Epics | Series of fantasy books | The Book of One Thousand and One Nights | Pederasty | Motif of harmful sensation


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  #9  
Old 08-25-2006, 02:19 AM
Flyby2000 Flyby2000 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo_
I believe a close study of Arabian Literature may hold the key to wiping out this deadly ideology.

The Book of One Thousand and One Nights

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Arabian nights)
Jump to: navigation, search
Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar.


"Arabian Nights" redirects here. For other uses, see Arabian Nights (disambiguation).
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (Persian: هزار و یک شب Hazār-o Yak *ab, Arabic: كتاب ألف ليلة و ليلة‎ Kitāb 'Alf Layla wa-Layla; also known as The Book of a Thousand Nights and a Night, One Thousand and One Nights, 1001 Arabian Nights, Arabian Nights, The Nightly Entertainments or simply The Nights) is a medieval Middle-Eastern literary epic which tells the story of Scheherazade (Shahrzad in Persian), a Sassanid Queen, who must relate a series of stories to her malevolent husband, King Shahryar, to delay her execution. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she ends the story with a suspenseful situation, forcing the King to keep her alive for another day. The individual stories were created over many centuries, by many people and in many styles, and they have become famous in their own right. Notable examples include Aladdin, Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.
Contents

[hide]//
[edit]

History

The nucleus of the stories is formed by a Pahlavi Sassanid Persian book called Hazār Afsānah[1] ("Thousand Myths", in Persian: هزارافسانه). During the reign of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid in the 8th century, Baghdad had become an important cosmopolitan city. Merchants from Persia, China, India, Africa, and Europe were all found in Baghdad. It was during this time that many of the stories, which were originally folk stories, are thought to have been collected orally over many years and later then compiled into a single book. The later compiler and translator into Arabic is reputedly storyteller Abu abd-Allah Muhammed el-Gahshigar in the 9th century. The frame story of Shahrzad seems to have been added in the 14th century. The first modern Arabic compilation, made out of Egyptian writings, was published in Cairo in 1835.
[edit]

Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
See also: List of stories within The Book of One Thousand and One Nights
The story takes place in the Sassanid era and begins with the Persian king Shahryar. The king rules an unnamed island "between India and China" (in modern editions based on Arab transcripts he is king of India and China). When Shahryar discovers his wife plotting with a lover to kill him, he has the pair executed. Believing all women to be likewise unfaithful, he gives his vizier an order to get him a new wife every night (in some versions, every third night). After spending one night with his bride, the king has her executed at dawn. This practice continues for some time, until the vizier's clever daughter Sheherazade ("Scheherazade" in English, or "Shahrastini", a Persian name) forms a plan and volunteers to become Shahrayar's next wife. With the help of her sister Dunyazad, every night after their marriage she spends hours telling him stories, each time stopping at dawn with a cliffhanger, so the king will postpone the execution out of a desire to hear the rest of the tale. In the end, she has given birth to three sons, and the king has been convinced of her faithfulness and revoked his decree.
The tales vary widely; they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and Muslim religious legends. Some of the famous stories Shahrazad spins in many western translations are Aladdin's Lamp, the Persian Sindbad the Sailor, and the tale of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves; however Aladdin and Ali Baba were in fact inserted only in the 18th century by Antoine Galland, a French orientalist, who claimed to have heard them in oral form from a Maronite story-teller from Aleppo in Syria. Numerous stories depict djinn, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography; the historical caliph Harun al-Rashid is a common protagonist, as are his alleged court poet Abu Nuwas and his vizier, Ja'far al-Barmaki. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.
On the final (one thousand and first) night Sheherazade presents the King with their three sons and she asks him for a complete pardon. He grants her this and they live in relative satisfaction.
Note: the narrator's standards for what consitutes a cliffhanger seem broader than in modern literature. While in many cases a story is cut off with the hero in life danger or another kind of deep trouble, in some parts of the full text Scheherazade stops her narration in the middle of an exposition of abstract philosophical principles or abstruse points of Islamic theology, and in one case during a detailed description of human anatomy according to Galen - and in all these cases turns out to be justified in her belief that the king's curiosity about the sequel would buy her another day of life.
Spoilers end here.
[edit]

Editions


The book cover of Sir Richard Francis Burton edition.


The work is made up of a collection of stories thought to be from traditional Persian, Arabic, and Indian stories. The core stories probably originated in an Iranic Empire and were brought together in a Persian work called Hazar Afsanah ("A Thousand Legends"). The Arabic compilation Alf Layla (A Thousand Nights), originating about 850 AD, was in turn probably an abridged translation of Hezar Afsaneh. Some of its elements appear in the Odyssey. The present name Alf Layla wa-Layla (literally a "A Thousand Nights and a Night", i.e. "1001 Nights") seems to have appeared at an unknown time in the Middle Ages, and expresses the idea of a transfinite number since 1000 represented conceptual infinity within Arabic mathematical circles.
The first European version (and first printed edition) was a translation into French (1704 - 1717) by Antoine Galland from an earlier compilation that was written in Arabic. This 12 volume book, Les Mille et une nuits, contes arabes traduits en français ("Thousand and one nights, Arab stories translated into French") probably included Arabic stories known to the translator but not included in the Arabic compilation. Aladdin's Lamp and Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves appeared first in Galland's translation and cannot be found in the original writings. He wrote that he heard them from a Syrian Christian storyteller from Aleppo, a Maronite scholar, Youhenna Diab, whom he called 'Hanna'.

John Payne, Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories, (London 1901) gives details of Galland's encounter with 'Hanna' in 1709 and of the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin and two more of the 'interpolated' tales. He instances Galland's own experience to demonstrate the lack of regard for such entertainments in the mainstream of Islamic scholarship, with the result that
…complete copies of the genuine work were rarely to be met with, collections… and the fragmentary copies which existed were mostly in the hands of professional story-tellers, who were extremely unwilling to part with them, looking upon them as their stock in trade, and were in the habit of incorporating with the genuine text all kinds of stories and anecdotes from other sources, to fill the place of the missing portions of the original work. This process of addition and incorporation, which has been in progress ever since the first collection of the Nights into one distinct work and is doubtless still going on in Oriental countries, (especially such as are least in contact with European influence,) may account for the heterogeneous character of the various modern manuscripts of the Nights and for the immense difference which exists between the several texts, as well in actual contents as in the details and diction of such stories as are common to all.

Perhaps the best-known translation to English speakers is that by Sir Richard Francis Burton, entitled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (1885). Unlike previous editions, his ten volume translation was not bowdlerized. Though printed in the Victorian era, it contained all the erotic nuances of the source material, replete with sexual imagery and pederastic allusions added as appendices to the main stories by Burton. Burton circumvented strict Victorian laws on obscene material by printing an edition for subscribers only rather than formally publishing the book. The original ten volumes were followed by a further six entitled The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night which were printed between 1886 and 1888.
More recent versions are that of the French doctor J. C. Mardrus, translated into English by Powys Mathers, and, notably, a critical edition based on the 14th century Syrian manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, compiled in Arabic by Muhsin Mahdi and rendered into English by Husain Haddawy, the most accurate and elegant of all to this date.
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has an estranged cousin: The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki. A Polish noble of the late 18th century, he traveled the Orient looking for an original edition of The Book... but never found it. Upon returning to Europe, he wrote his masterpiece, a multi-leveled frame tale.
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Adaptations

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Film and Television


Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar, in the ABC/BBC Miniseries Arabian Nights.


There have been many adaptations of the Nights, for both television and the big screen, with varying degrees of faithfulness to the original stories.
The atmosphere of the Nights influenced such films as Fritz Lang's 1921 Der müde Tod, the 1924 Hollywood film The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, and its 1940 British remake. It also influenced The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), the first surviving feature-length animated film.
One of Hollywood's first feature films to be based on the Nights was in 1942, with the movie named Arabian Nights. It starred Maria Montez as Scheherazade, Sabu Dastagir as Ali Ben Ali and Jon Hall as Harun al-Rashid. The storyline bears virtually no resemblance to the traditional version of the Nights. In the film Scheherazade is a dancer, who attempts to overthrow Caliph Harun al-Rashid and marry his brother. Unfortunately Scheherazade’s initial coup attempt fails and she is sold into slavery, many adventures then ensue. Maria Montez and Jon Hall also starred in the 1944 film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
The 1980s "1001 Erotic Nights", starring Annette Haven as Scheherazade and John Leslie as Shahryar, was supposedly the first X-rated movie with a million-dollar budget.
The most commercially successful movie based on the Nights was Aladdin, the 1992 animated movie by the Walt Disney Company, which starred Scott Weinger and Robin Williams. The film led to several sequels and a television series of the same name.
The Voyages of Sinbad have been adapted for television and film several times, the most recent of which was in the 2003 animated feature Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, which starred Brad Pitt and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Perhaps the most famous Sinbad film was the 1958 movie The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, produced by the stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen.
A recent well-received television adaptation was the Emmy award winning miniseries Arabian Nights, directed by Steve Barron and starring Mili Avital as Scheherazade and Dougray Scott as Shahryar. It was originally shown over two nights on April 30, and May 1, 2000 on ABC in the United States and BBC One in the United Kingdom.
Other notable versions of the Nights include the famous 1974 Italian movie Il fiore delle mille e una notte by Pier Paolo Pasolini and the 1990 French movie Les 1001 nuits, which starred Catherine Zeta-Jones as Scheherazade. There are also numerous Bollywood movies, such as Aladdin and Sinbad in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures; in this version, the lamp's djin is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
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Video Games

The upcoming game Sonic and the Secret Rings (2007), according to SEGA's press release announcing the game, will be a loose adaptation of the Arabian Nights in which the last several pages from the Arabian Nights storybook have gone missing, and it's up to Sonic to re-create the story.
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Upcoming Movies

A film entitled 1001 Nights, written by Jeff Vlaming and due out 2006, is to be set in the present day and star Juliette Binoche and Laurence Fishburne. It portrays Scheherazade’s equivalent as the unfaithful wife of a mobster, who is kidnapped by her husband's henchmen and forced to tell stories in order to win her freedom.
Another film based on the Nights, is due out in 2007 and is simply named Arabian Nights. Written by Enio Rigolin, it will depict a more traditional version of the Nights set in ancient Persia.
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Music

In 1888, Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov completed his Op. 35 Scheherazade, in four movements, based upon four of the tales from the Arabian Nights; The Sea and Sinbad's Ship, The Kalendar Prince, The Young Prince and The Young Princess, and Festival At Baghdad.
In 1975, the band Renaissance released an album called Scheherazade and Other Stories. The second half of this album consists entirely of the Song Of Scheherazade, an orchestral-rock composition based on the Arabian Nights stories.
In 2003, Nordic experimental indie pop group When released an album called "Pearl Harvest" with lyrics from Arabian Nights. "Ebony Horse", "Goose poor Goose, "Prince Kamar" and "Keys" are all taken directly from Arabian Nights. The music is also an ironic reflection on it, combining Beach Boys rock & roll with plunderphonics.
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Notes
  1. ^ Abdol Hossein Saeedian, "Land and People of Iran" p. 447
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See also[edit]

External links

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References



Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arabian Nights



Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: One Thousand and One Nights

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Film and television links[edit]

Music linksRetrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boo...and_One_Nights"
Categories: Arabic literature | Persian literature | Persian mythology | Indian literature | Epics | Series of fantasy books | The Book of One Thousand and One Nights | Pederasty | Motif of harmful sensation


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An excellent article and it's also available in a number of different languages, as well.
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