Israel Military Forum

Welcome to the Israel Military Forum. You are currently viewing our Israel Forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, Image Forum and access our other features. By joining our Israel Military Forum you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so
Join Our Israel Community Today!
If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.
Go Back   Israel Military Forum > Israel National security > Physical Fitness
Register FAQ Pictures Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Physical Fitness your guide to physical fitness, training methods

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-18-2014, 06:51 PM
Seanzerz Seanzerz is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Seanzerz is on a distinguished road
Default Physical training in combat units? (Input please!)

Hello everyone. For those who would have knowledge, how physically challenging/demanding is the training for combat units in the IDF. Units such as Golani or tzanchanim. I consider my self to be physically fit but I would like to know some details of the training in boot camp and basic training or maybe some personal stories/experiences if possible. Please feel free to leave as much detail as possible.

Some specific questions:
How intensive is the training?
What types of exercise? How often?
Are there daily runs? How long are the runs?
Under what conditions do people exercise? Rain, desert, snow?
Are injuries common?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-19-2014, 03:33 AM
rafi's Avatar
rafi rafi is offline
Zatoichi
PhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,717
rafi is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanzerz View Post
Hello everyone. For those who would have knowledge, how physically challenging/demanding is the training for combat units in the IDF. Units such as Golani or tzanchanim. I consider my self to be physically fit but I would like to know some details of the training in boot camp and basic training or maybe some personal stories/experiences if possible. Please feel free to leave as much detail as possible.

Some specific questions:
How intensive is the training?
What types of exercise? How often?
Are there daily runs? How long are the runs?
Under what conditions do people exercise? Rain, desert, snow?
Are injuries common?
First and foremost, learn how to use a search forum button. There are entire sections of this web site dedicated to your question.

As to answering it with apologies to those who have read it dozens of times already, here goes:

Think of every single kid you ever went to school with. Now picture your entire High School class. Every single one of them will go in the army and complete basic training.

No one cares if you can bench press cows and run a mile in 76 seconds. No one cares. sorry.

Now some real advice. instead of declaring how big and tough you are, learn hebrew. Because if you can't speak hebrew, you will spend 3 years in the IDF moving large objects from one spot to another. If you can't speak, you will never get past PFC. If you can't read and write you will never get past corporal.

Why should the IDF take you? What do you have that they need.
There is no shortage of manpower. Why you? And again, save the bologna about serving the Jewish people. Are you willing to serve the Jewish people driving a supply truck for three years? Or are you another who is "willing to die for Israel" but not willing ot be bored for her?

And we haven't even gotten to the fun questions about the type of documentation you think you have that you will need to get into the IDF.

Rafi
__________________
For information about enlisting in the IDF please see our archives from the now closed web site: http://www.mahal-idf-volunteers.org/
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-22-2014, 10:46 PM
judea judea is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 41
judea is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanzerz View Post

Some specific questions:
How intensive is the training?
What types of exercise? How often?
Are there daily runs? How long are the runs?
Under what conditions do people exercise? Rain, desert, snow?
Are injuries common?
- Training depends on where you land in the army entirely. In the regular army, physical training (pushups, runs) is kind of a joke, but the mental parts are still tough. (Long long walks with heavy stuff).
- Types of exercise also depend on your unit. So many units, can't be more specific than that, sorry.
- Runs are usually a few times a week. You will eventually get up to 10-15km runs. They would do more, but there's no time for anything longer than that. They're trying to keep you "not fat" not make you into a marathon runner.
- Every condition is exercise condition. If it's too hot, it's not allowed in most units to exercise...but there is no such thing as too cold. And in the case of too hot, they'll just do it before the sun comes up or after it's down.
- Injuries are all too common, yes. The injuries are not usually due to physical fitness though. They are closer to physical therapy. You need to strengthen all the little tendons and joints that hold your body together. Muscle helps too, but isn't as important. Depending on what you carry, you could come out of the army with back, knee, shoulder, or neck problems, to name a few.

Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-23-2014, 03:15 AM
rafi's Avatar
rafi rafi is offline
Zatoichi
PhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,717
rafi is on a distinguished road
Default

Most of what was written is very accurate.

I served at the Mount Hermon outpost and we ran when we could get out the door. I served in Sinai and we ran at 04:30. I finished keva (regular army) in the best shape of my life.

But I also want to add, very important, that at age 58 I am still passing the physical and serving every year. Only injury ever was a broken thumb.
__________________
For information about enlisting in the IDF please see our archives from the now closed web site: http://www.mahal-idf-volunteers.org/
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-30-2014, 12:38 AM
Seanzerz Seanzerz is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Seanzerz is on a distinguished road
Default

Thank you Judea for your thoughtful answer, you answered many things I was curious about. From my understanding from your answer and some other sources the physical fitness of IDF is challenging however, the mental fitness is much more challenging and more important.

Rafi, thank you for your posts. My hebrew is proficient, and I am constantly working to strengthen it. I was much more curious to the physical fitness aspects of IDF and I definitely did not intend to come off as arrogant. Apologies if that is how I came off or interpreted.

If anyone would like to add to this I would be very happy and appreciative to read what you have to say. I would really enjoy some personal challenges and stories. Thank you to everyone in advance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by judea View Post
- Training depends on where you land in the army entirely. In the regular army, physical training (pushups, runs) is kind of a joke, but the mental parts are still tough. (Long long walks with heavy stuff).
- Types of exercise also depend on your unit. So many units, can't be more specific than that, sorry.
- Runs are usually a few times a week. You will eventually get up to 10-15km runs. They would do more, but there's no time for anything longer than that. They're trying to keep you "not fat" not make you into a marathon runner.
- Every condition is exercise condition. If it's too hot, it's not allowed in most units to exercise...but there is no such thing as too cold. And in the case of too hot, they'll just do it before the sun comes up or after it's down.
- Injuries are all too common, yes. The injuries are not usually due to physical fitness though. They are closer to physical therapy. You need to strengthen all the little tendons and joints that hold your body together. Muscle helps too, but isn't as important. Depending on what you carry, you could come out of the army with back, knee, shoulder, or neck problems, to name a few.

Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-30-2014, 09:13 PM
rafi's Avatar
rafi rafi is offline
Zatoichi
PhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,717
rafi is on a distinguished road
Default

I have just learned of something I had never heard before.

A lone soldier, in Israel in the MAHAL program did not pass the ulpan and has not been assigned to a unit. The soldier has a 97 profile and was, in his words, "proficient in Hebrew".

The recruit in question is currently working in the kitchen of a base in the Negev washing pots. Alluding to past posts of mine, there obviously aren't any heavy objects that need moving from one side of the base to the other. That and washing pots are the unfortunate new destiny of those who do not pass the course.

My understanding is the soldier will be retested in three months, then the remainder of his service will be determined.

This is confirmed first person information, I do have the name and dog tag (mispar ishi) of the soldier involved.

I will keep everyone in the loop.
__________________
For information about enlisting in the IDF please see our archives from the now closed web site: http://www.mahal-idf-volunteers.org/
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-30-2014, 11:24 PM
Seanzerz Seanzerz is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Seanzerz is on a distinguished road
Default

Thank you Rafi for that information. I am more encouraged to better my hebrew skills. Thank you very much for sharing this, please pass on more information.

I see that you really empathize the importance of Hebrew. Do you have any suggestions of what I can do to practice on my own?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rafi View Post
I have just learned of something I had never heard before.

A lone soldier, in Israel in the MAHAL program did not pass the ulpan and has not been assigned to a unit. The soldier has a 97 profile and was, in his words, "proficient in Hebrew".

The recruit in question is currently working in the kitchen of a base in the Negev washing pots. Alluding to past posts of mine, there obviously aren't any heavy objects that need moving from one side of the base to the other. That and washing pots are the unfortunate new destiny of those who do not pass the course.

My understanding is the soldier will be retested in three months, then the remainder of his service will be determined.

This is confirmed first person information, I do have the name and dog tag (mispar ishi) of the soldier involved.

I will keep everyone in the loop.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-01-2014, 03:23 PM
rafi's Avatar
rafi rafi is offline
Zatoichi
PhotobucketPhotobucket
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,717
rafi is on a distinguished road
Default

Sean,
I can never emphasize the importance of Hebrew enough. There is no English in the IDF except what people are willing to offer you in help. The language of Israel is Hebrew.

Physical acumen is important, but to advance you have to make the army love you for your mind not your body.

On the internet there are myriad opportunities to improve Hebrew. Israel Broadcasting Authority a great web site, has regular news from Israel as well as regular Israeli broadcast in "easy" Hebrew. I would start with one and go back and forth. People speak fast, it takes some work. There are also web sites devoted to the daily newspapers in both regular and easy Hebrew. The talk shows are great, as they reflect all levels of Hebrew. And they are often fun - much more passionate than the US.

And of course speaking whenever you get the chance right now. Make certain the people you are speaking to understand that you want them to correct you. Otherwise they will be content to understand your meaning. Great for a conversation, not so great for you.

You should be in decent shape, it can only help. But again, the guy who comes in third helping someone will always be chosen over the guy who came in first stepping over someone else.

While it was many years ago that I went in to the Army, my entire career there was helped by my ability to make myself understood. For whatever reason, I picked up Hebrew easily and it stuck. One thing I am convinced of is the time I spent before going in to the army was invaluable. I lived and worked for 6 months in a small town in the middle of the Negev where there were 6 people who spoke English. Often ignored, but of equal importance are the cultural differences, the group patterns and social behavior of growing up in Israel. I couldn't pick it up in 6 months, but it helped me to know it when I saw it.

It is a terrible shock for many foreigners to discover the IDF will not, in any way shape or form go out of it's way to make you feel special or that you deserve special considerations because you volunteered versus being drafted. There is great support for the needs of life, but you won't win a "tie" because you are foreign.

Scour the internet, there are numerous threads of Lone Soldiers sharing their experiences. Many will be disappointing, but a plane to Israel does not change who you are, just where you are. I think you understand my meaning. People change because they want to, and for some there was a belief the plane ride, versus effort, will do so.

The IDF was one of the most important experiences of my life, and continued well into my 50s. I do recommend it highly.

If you have more personal questions, please contact me via private message.
__________________
For information about enlisting in the IDF please see our archives from the now closed web site: http://www.mahal-idf-volunteers.org/
Reply With Quote
Israel Forum
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Israel Military Forum